digibell.co.uk

How it works

The Problem

Traditional Bells

Since ancient times the traditional catbell has been the goto solution whenever there are critters to be caught.

The modern cat is usually just a furry friend we like to have around. But they still hunt even when we don't want them to.

The problem is cats are too smart. They learn to move without a traditional bell making any sound. Until its too late.

As many a cat owner will testify, traditional bells just don't work!

STAGE ONE

STALKING

With a traditional bell cats learn to move so they don't make any sound. Leaving the prey unaware.

STAGE TWO

AMBUSH

When the cat is completely still a traditional bell has no way to make any sound, so the prey is not alerted.

STAGE THREE

POUNCE

During the pounce, traditional bells only make a sound at the last moment. This is too late for the prey to escape.

The Solution

Digibell

Using an intelligent digital core, Digibell is able to detect your cat's movements and translate this into multiple prey alerts throughout the hunt cycle.

Unlike a tranditional cat bell, Digibell will alert not only when the cat is moving towards the prey, but also while the cat is stalking and ambushing.

This intelligent design means that even the smartest cat will find it impossible to successfully hunt without making any sound at all!

STAGE ONE

STALKING

Digibell is sensitive enough to detect when the cat is stalking and alert the prey. Giving it plenty of time to get away.

STAGE TWO

AMBUSH

Digibell is intelligent enough to alert multiple times while the cat is waiting to ambush the prey.

STAGE THREE

POUNCE

With Digibell a pounce almost never occurs as the prey has already escaped.

Facts & Figures

According to the journal Nature it is estimated cats kill up to 4 billion birds and 22.3 billion mammals annually in the United States alone. Worldwide these numbers are thought to be significantly higher.

"Everyone knows that cats kill birds, but ... at a national level, the amount of predation is staggering, and is likely to be driving the ongoing decline of many species."

Professor John Woinarski of Charles Darwin University